DD’s Blog Universe: The Right Not to Vote

 

To vote or not to vote.  That is the question.

My answer is not to vote.  I don’t choose to.  Politics and all its feeble and filthy trappings don’t appeal to me. It’s not one of my hobbies.  I enjoy writing, playing golf, following the news from my alma mater, the University of Notre Dame, and rooting for the Yankees, among a multitude of other things that do not include politics. If I ever run out of distractions, I have my family to enjoy and can reminisce about my other family of friends that I spent time with studying abroad in Angers, France.

Let’s look at what the normal voting process involves.  One must register, which is no big deal.  It makes sense to track and regulate this facet for the sake of statistics and avoiding multiple ballots being cast by individuals.  Now comes the distasteful part from my perspective.  You go to vote and you usually have a choice of a number of candidates in primaries and even fewer in national or state type elections. You are choosing from people who want to be a politician.  Why? I’m sure they explain their platform in a number of ways but a paradox surfaces at a couple levels.  Number one, a person invests money – a lot of money – to get a job that pays far less than the investment.  The cynic in me figures it has to be that he/ she figures they can make up the difference through lobbyist payouts, political favoritism, and blatant bribes.  Witness the absurd and obscene financial worth of career politicians.  The second paradox evolves from the first.  Would you want either a person who is dumb enough to invest more money than he/she gets in return (ergo an idiot business person) or a person who is a thief?  However, when one goes to vote, they are, in fact, doing just that – choosing one or the other.

I have heard all the sophomoric arguments from staunch, brainwashed people who believe it is unthinkable that a person would not vote, which supposedly is some type of inalienable right.  There are a multitude of subjective, weak arguments posed by this sector of the population.  The one quote, though, that always stuck in my mind was from Mark Twain who said “If voting made a difference, they wouldn’t let you do it!”

The two greatest and perpetuating scams foisted upon humans are organized religion and voting/politics.  People are brainwashed from an early age by those brainwashed before them.  They usually are devoid of critical thinking, rarely peeling back the layers, constantly questioning reasons why, despite their native intelligence.  It’s a Catch 22, so to speak.  The information they cling to like a sacred cow has been handed down and postulated by people they trust and believe in, whether it be family, teachers, scholars, and the like.  There is an inner sense of loyalty to the information from whence it came.  So, in essence, to repudiate it would be a betrayal of who or what they consider an authority.  However, if they dig deep into their intellectual stores, they would likely conclude that it really doesn’t make a difference one way or the other.

Let’s just focus on voting formulated for the highest level, national elections.  Predominantly, the voter is given a choice of two candidates, currently a democrat and a republican.  Two choices out of millions of people.  The assumption is that one is different than the other.  They are not.  They are the same – politicians who ultimately perform in the same manner, prevalent for decades, doing what is expedient to serve those who fund their lifestyles (lobbyists, big pharma, and other special interest groups), and spout enough rhetoric to be re-elected so they can continue year after year to do nothing relevant.  So, your candidate is elected then summarily abandons his/her platform due to political maneuvering. Congratulations on the vote you cast.

There are so many scenarios that can be extrapolated from the quagmire of politics that it would take volumes to even scratch the surface.  I choose not to vote and it amazes me how many people do not respect my right with the same objectivity that I respect their right to vote.  Voting and not voting are personal choices. Nothing more, nothing less. Mustard or ketchup.  Coke or Pepsi.  Baseball or football.  Democrat or republican.  That’s it. Anyone who ascribes any higher rank to such a practice has been brainwashed and likely avoids thinking beyond what they’ve been taught and told, lacking the ability to think deeper or see an alternate side to their own belief.  They contradict the principle of freedom of choice for someone else when it doesn’t coincide with their standard.  Or, from another perspective, they are obtaining personal gain from the practice. Money and status are two perks to support voting.  Of course, there is also the element of feeling relevant.  I am being asked for my opinion.  Wow, they must really think I have something to offer.  I’m wanted!  Sorry to burst anyone’s bubble, but I refer back to the Mark Twain quote I cited earlier.

One of the inaner arguments that I have heard from the hollow barrels of pro-voting blowhards is “You didn’t vote so you can’t complain about what the government is doing.”  How stupid is that?  To paraphrase a George Carlin response to this obvious idiocy, he says that since he didn’t vote, he’s the only one that can complain because he had nothing to do with the individual(s) getting elected.  There is a plethora of other similar arguments that justify the voter’s stance, which is human nature – justify one’s actions instead of believing and adhering to the logical concept that there are choices.  Humans possess the blessing and curse of being able to think and therefore twist rhetoric to support what they believe and subvert opposing views.  I just want to say it’s OK.  Other people might have a different viewpoint that is just as valid as yours.  Grow up and get on with existence and stop worrying about or trying to control everyone else’s.

I recently read that if you don’t vote, you are supporting the platform of the incumbents which, to some, is highly distasteful.  Again, an example of another false statement and mimicking what has been heard or force-fed by other like-minded individuals.  No one can determine what I support just because how I go about expressing my opinion doesn’t agree with what they think or how they believe it should be done.  That is childish to say the least! Perhaps I believe both sides running for elected positions are full of crap (I do).  What then?  It’s like being asked if I’d rather die by being burned to death or my head chopped off.  Come on, folks!  Give me a viable alternative.

And if we can’t arrive at a common ground, let’s expand the number of people to vote for. Then there would be a better chance of alternatives where we would not be saddled choosing the filth of a career politician or some wannabe trying to cash in on self-interest group payola at the nearest millionaire machine.

I believe in everyone’s right to make personal choices in their life that agrees with their principles.  If anyone cannot support such practice, regardless of their personal viewpoint on an issue, they are hypocrites, plain and simple.

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DD’s Blog Universe: Volume 8, Post 3 : The Cure for Death

 

I consider myself an armchair existentialist.  The purpose of my life is my responsibility, no one else’s.  I adhere to a personal moral code to guide my actions relative to the world and the people in it, most logically those I encounter and with whom I have a relationship, even if it be only cursory. Religion and politics are not part of the equation insofar as those people are following their personal life guidelines and how it affects me is frankly my response to it within the framework of my moral code.  Both religion and politics are personal choices and not requirements for life.

One of the inevitable consequences of existence is death.  Here is a poem I wrote about the line we’re in as humans:

                                                as the line moves along

There’s a line we all join

Stretching far beyond the horizon

With future millennia waiting impatiently,

Always in a rush, the youthful part of a generation,

Not understanding the line until it moves forward,

Past the ignorance of youth.

The oldest are at the front of the line,

Though it is not uncommon for younger people to cut in

And take a place that was not meant for them.

The line moves at a regular pace,

With those that leave

Replaced by those that enter.

 

There is no distinction.

Money, beauty, intelligence, notoriety,

None of these qualities mean anything.

The common man is equal to the king,

The sick equivalent to the healthy,

The intelligent standing with the imbecile.

 

The line is the road to death.

It begins at birth and trudges over a lifetime.

One has no choice whether to be in it or not.

It is each mortal’s destiny.

It is the ominous line to nowhere.

It may not be obvious but I, for one, do not believe in an after-life.  The finality of death scares me.  The promise of an after-life is a crapshoot.  Anyone that might come forward to verify such an existence is dead. Mediums, psychics, priests, and a variety of other scam artists will attest to an after-life for their own personal gain.  In the end, though, it’s no more reliable than the handicapper picking a horse in the fifth race at Belmont or the shill’s point spread on next weekend’s football games.

Yet, mankind in its infinite, albeit flawed, wisdom, has been able to come up with a cure for death, and, yes, that is the dangling carrot of an after-life that organized religions, and lawmakers in a round-about way, use to bait their customers.  And the customers buy into the premise whole-heartedly since the prospect of nothing after living a life – a void or abyss that swallows up the souls of the dead – would likely cause a great deal of anxiety and a potential for people to do whatever they want without fear of retribution.

The concept of an after-life goes back to ancient times.  The early response to death was not to bury the individual, but to let the body decay.  When this posed a health threat, measures were taken to appease the “soul” of the departed since the illnesses were attributed to the dissatisfied soul versus the bacteria-laden corpse.  The illnesses were a sign that the person was unhappy so there must be another state of being beyond this life.  Of course, religions, especially the greatest work of fiction all time, the Bible, capitalized on people’s beliefs and promised a road to death that would be their salvation in the after-life.  They even created gradations of reward and punishment.  Heaven was a place for those that led a good and virtuous life. Purgatory was the waiting list for those that needed a few more credits to enter heaven.  Purgatorians relied on prayers and interventions from the living to push them past the finish line and through the Pearly Gates.  Limbo is just a totally fabricated place that no one can comprehend, though when I was a practicing Roman Catholic, I was told it was the place where unbaptized people spent the rest of their existence.  It wasn’t heaven, but it wasn’t the ghetto either. And, of course, Hell, depicted as the most gruesome of all destinations, ruled by the Devil or Satan or whatever pet name one might have for the Prince of Darkness.  Horrendous conditions, fire and brimstone, are Hell’s character traits. This naturally helped control people’s actions relative to daily living since no one wanted to be guilty of wrong-doing lest they be sent to hell.  They also created heroes to champion the heaven gambit, sort of The Immortal Avengers. To name a few, Jesus “Don’t call me Josephson” Christ; Muhammad (no last name); Joseph Smith; a bunch of Jews who still await the Messiah but blather on about an after-life anyway; John Calvin; and a number of other wannabes like James Jones and his Kool Aid salvation troops.

There you have it!  Mankind’s fabricated rationalization to make life worth living.  One of the drawbacks of such a universal sales pitch regarding an after-life is suicide.  How many ill-advised and utopic idealists killed themselves because, in their limited, warped mind “…heaven has to be better than this life.”  Another motivation to die is the highly exaggerated premise that, when you die, you will be re-united with all your loved ones, including pets and teen-age crushes, for all eternity without pain or suffering due to mortgages, dental bills, and parvo vaccinations.  “Mom and Dad are finally back together” goes the tear-streaked saying that is meant to comfort families.  “He/she’s in a better place” is another common adage that has no foundation   What if heaven (not to mention purgatory or hell) is not a better place than one’s earthly existence?  From what we are being sold, it’s paradise (another name commonly associated with heaven), again with no worries but divine consciousness.  What if it’s like Russia or Chuck E. Cheese on a Saturday?

I hope for my parents’ sake there is an after-life since they devoted so much of their lives to the church and its dog and pony show, complete with promise of heaven and ultimately being with the Cosmic Muffin, God (no last name) herself. They paid dearly financially for that privilege so I hope they get their money’s worth.  However, I just don’t see it, nor can I grasp the Fantasy Land that is the universal cure for death because, in essence, under the after-life definition, one never dies.

But you die, no doubt about it.  Just don’t let insurance companies know about the “one never dies” theory since it could be a huge loophole in their payout policy.

 

 

DD’s Blog Universe: Volume 8 Post 2 :THE PROPHESY OF GEORGE COSTANZA

Who would have ever believed that a premise from an old comedy would predict the future? Yet, it has come to pass where a multitude of shows being aired on what can be marginally classified as respectable television are shows about nothing.

If you followed the Seinfeld episodes at all, you likely recall Jerry (Seinfeld) and George (Costanza) pitching a sitcom to NBC. “What’s the show about?” one of the TV executives wanted to know. “Nothing!” George replied. “It’s a show about nothing.” The exec continued on and described activities like getting up, shaving, having breakfast, and going to work. “That’s a show!” George proclaimed. The premise continued on its ludicrous path, and ultimately the show about nothing was approved as a pilot for NBC, but never made it past the pilot phase.

Of course, this was a comedic scene from a sitcom and was far-fetched, which is why it’s so funny. Well, friends, the joke is on us, or at least those of us who prefer that televised programs carry some semblance of appeal to people with brains. Reality shows have infested the airwaves like a swarm of vultures devouring a carcass. A myriad of mindless programs rear their senseless heads in triumph as TV executives continue to cast this swill to swine. They are shows about nothing. There are housewives from every corner of the nation sitting around blathering about daily lives that are tedious and banal at best. More times than not, the dialogue borders on common idiocy dealing with premises resolved by most people before puberty. Self-appointed kings of nothing become the idols of those suffering from IQ deprivation.

One of my thoughts about this whole menagerie of fools is that TV executives sit in a room and try to come up with the most moronic, intelligence-depraved premise they can conjure up. They then find the fools to fill the show. However, like Reginald Perrin, they never seem to
fall face down into muck. Instead, huge followings adopt the stupidity as their own and the saga continues. I looked up the number of these shows now on TV and stopped in disgust when I reached one hundred.

It’s sad to think that anyone could spend time watching these shows. Obviously, the TV executives and those participating in the shows aren’t the fools. They are the winners in the shell game. The real imbeciles are those who lend any credence to these dog and pony shows, who actually become engaged in the lives of those people portrayed. The show’s “stars” are common nobodies made into celebrities by common fools. The talent of those we used to laugh at and put on a pedestal as celebrities – Lucille Ball, Jerry Lewis, RedSkelton, Jackie Gleason, et. Al. – were talented actors and comedians. Reality shows have bred a whole class of people who are neither funny nor talented. Their lives are nothing and so are their programs. Yet, as long as people choose to place value on banality and lower the percent they utilize their brain, these shows will exist and thrive.

“Why am I watching it?” the NBC Executive asked George Costanza about the sitcom they were presenting. “Because it’s on TV,” George replied. “Not yet it isn’t,” NBC countered.

Well, now it is and it’s spreading like a bad case of the flu with no apparent antidote on the horizon.

DD’s Blog Universe: Volume 8 Post 1: The “Me First” Generation

Over the course of every year, there are a multitude of events that rekindle awareness of The Greatest Generation.  Armistice Day, Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day and the commemoration of the attack on Pearl Harbor, among others, all remind us of the history of this generation.

Spawned from this group of people were the generations to follow and in the true sense of American marketing and profiteering, titles were given to each.  My generation was tabbed the Baby Boomers since we were conceived after World War II in the midst of burgeoning prosperity.  GenX and the Millenials, our progeny, are the incumbent rulers of the corporate and financial roost and therefore, the government.  There have also been a couple other non-descript “Gens”  littering the decades since then with similar self-centered tendencies.

Why was the greatest generation so many years ago?  Wouldn’t it be logical to think that the following generations would be even better?  Not so, in my estimation and let’s explore why that might be by characterizing each.

First, The Greatest Generation.  For the most part, these people would have been born during or just after World War I.  They had experienced war and then poverty during the Great Depression.  Another war, even bigger than the first, ensued.  Yet, a spirit of cooperation and unity, aligned with our title of United States, prevailed.  Sacrifices were common.  Men were eager to serve their country, even those who might feel a sense of privilege in modern times.  Witness celebrities like Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, Jerry Coleman, Bob Feller, John Wayne, and Audie Murphy fulfilling their duty to their country.  I could add many more.  There was the spirit of the war effort back home with a multitude of activities that supported our troops.

This was just the period involved with World War II.  The Depression brought many to their knees, yet Americans suffered through the time and pulled themselves up by the bootstraps.  Family was at the heart of existence and respect for parents and authority were the norm.  The United States had the good fortune of having one of the best Presidents in office at the time, that being Franklin D. Roosevelt.  Of course, one of the things that contributed to his greatness was the fact that the country pulled together to face its problems.  I’m sure there were squabbles in the Senate and House, and not everyone idolized Roosevelt and his programs, but when it came to the important, critical issues, everyone propelled the boat in the same direction, that being in the best interest of America.  Remember this as we explore the following generations.

OK, now for the Baby Boomers.  I have the most familiarity with this group since I am one of them. We were the first-born child and we were doted upon.  We grew up during a period of abundance and became spoiled, throwing tantrums when we didn’t get our way.  Riots were not uncommon.  Protests came from both sides of the fence, usually lacking the insight that opposite outcomes of the same issue could never exist in practice.  Individuality was nurtured through self-expression and personal rights.  The sense of community began to disintegrate and personal gratification took its place. The sense of purpose began to gravitate toward self.  The sense of family dissolved.  Mind-altering drugs became the sibling of alcohol as part of the age-old escape from reality.  We didn’t want to confront reality and come up with solutions like the previous generation.  Even compromise seemed inadequate to control our tantrums.  Politicians, realizing the futility, started to board the self-interest bandwagon.  Young men spurned the military and debased the Viet Nam “conflict” and its veterans.  Despite all that we had, we were never satisfied.   We wrapped this all up in a pretty package and gave it to our children.  When they took it out of the box, they exhibited our petulance and took self-interest to the next level.

So now it’s GenX.  I have come up with another moniker to describe today’s generation and that is “Me First,” although many of these self-centered humans refer to themselves as millenials. This is where we are now.  Probably one of the more gratifying aspects displayed by this group is the return to respect for the military and the sacrifices those in uniform make for their country.  Perhaps we have Bin Laden to thank for that.  Nonetheless, there appears to be a reversal from scorning the military and law enforcement displayed by Baby Boomers, and this cancer hopefully has been forever cured.

Enough for the plaudits because there is a disgusting underbelly infesting Me First.”

I don’t know where to start since there are so many deficiencies inherent in the generation.  The obvious is the pre-occupation with self.  Ego is king.  Alpha personalities are applauded instead of scorned for their bullying mindset and tactics.  Advertising and marketing flaunt the “what’s in it for me” mentality.  Extravagance and ostentatious displays of opulence and greed have become the norm.  Noise and shallowness have replaced substance and thoughtfulness.  Government corruption is commonplace.  Corporations and banks rape the consumers and then bend the government over the table to extract bail-outs to fund their unrelenting greed.  People making millions of dollars steal so they can have more.  “Reality” TV brings the mindless inadequacies of people to the surface, effectively dumbing and numbing Americans while this audience of nitwits display their lack of substance by idolizing the mediocre.  Bi-partisan government and corruption evinces the true filth and worthlessness of politicians and their total lack of concern for what’s best for the country.  Instead, the focus is on what’s best for me.  Charities beg for money and then top officials either embezzle the funds or receive obscene salaries.

I’m sure I can go on with the comparison.  I also could find a great deal of good that has been created over the last sixty years with advances in medicine, technology, and embracing the

global community.  However, I can only look at aspects of the times I have known in assessing the generations in question.

I just hope that The Greatest Generation is yet to come.

DD’s Blog Universe: Volume 8 Post 1: The “Me First” Generation

Over the course of every year, there are a multitude of events that rekindle awareness of The Greatest Generation.  Armistice Day, Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day and the commemoration of the attack on Pearl Harbor, among others, all remind us of the history of this generation.

Spawned from this group of people were the generations to follow and in the true sense of American marketing and profiteering, titles were given to each.  My generation was tabbed the Baby Boomers since we were conceived after World War II in the midst of burgeoning prosperity.  GenX and the Millenials, our progeny, are the incumbent rulers of the corporate and financial roost and therefore, the government.  There have also been a couple other non-descript “Gens”  littering the decades since then with similar self-centered tendencies.

Why was the greatest generation so many years ago?  Wouldn’t it be logical to think that the following generations would be even better?  Not so, in my estimation and let’s explore why that might be by characterizing each.

First, The Greatest Generation.  For the most part, these people would have been born during or just after World War I.  They had experienced war and then poverty during the Great Depression.  Another war, even bigger than the first, ensued.  Yet, a spirit of cooperation and unity, aligned with our title of United States, prevailed.  Sacrifices were common.  Men were eager to serve their country, even those who might feel a sense of privilege in modern times.  Witness celebrities like Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, Jerry Coleman, Bob Feller, John Wayne, and Audie Murphy fulfilling their duty to their country.  I could add many more.  There was the spirit of the war effort back home with a multitude of activities that supported our troops.

This was just the period involved with World War II.  The Depression brought many to their knees, yet Americans suffered through the time and pulled themselves up by the bootstraps.  Family was at the heart of existence and respect for parents and authority were the norm.  The United States had the good fortune of having one of the best Presidents in office at the time, that being Franklin D. Roosevelt.  Of course, one of the things that contributed to his greatness was the fact that the country pulled together to face its problems.  I’m sure there were squabbles in the Senate and House, and not everyone idolized Roosevelt and his programs, but when it came to the important, critical issues, everyone propelled the boat in the same direction, that being in the best interest of America.  Remember this as we explore the following generations.

OK, now for the Baby Boomers.  I have the most familiarity with this group since I am one of them. We were the first-born child and we were doted upon.  We grew up during a period of abundance and became spoiled, throwing tantrums when we didn’t get our way.  Riots were not uncommon.  Protests came from both sides of the fence, usually lacking the insight that opposite outcomes of the same issue could never exist in practice.  Individuality was nurtured through self-expression and personal rights.  The sense of community began to disintegrate and personal gratification took its place. The sense of purpose began to gravitate toward self.  The sense of family dissolved.  Mind-altering drugs became the sibling of alcohol as part of the age-old escape from reality.  We didn’t want to confront reality and come up with solutions like the previous generation.  Even compromise seemed inadequate to control our tantrums.  Politicians, realizing the futility, started to board the self-interest bandwagon.  Young men spurned the military and debased the Viet Nam “conflict” and its veterans.  Despite all that we had, we were never satisfied.   We wrapped this all up in a pretty package and gave it to our children.  When they took it out of the box, they exhibited our petulance and took self-interest to the next level.

So now it’s GenX.  I have come up with another moniker to describe today’s generation and that is “Me First,” although many of these self-centered humans refer to themselves as millenials. This is where we are now.  Probably one of the more gratifying aspects displayed by this group is the return to respect for the military and the sacrifices those in uniform make for their country.  Perhaps we have Bin Laden to thank for that.  Nonetheless, there appears to be a reversal from scorning the military and law enforcement displayed by Baby Boomers, and this cancer hopefully has been forever cured.

Enough for the plaudits because there is a disgusting underbelly infesting Me First.”

I don’t know where to start since there are so many deficiencies inherent in the generation.  The obvious is the pre-occupation with self.  Ego is king.  Alpha personalities are applauded instead of scorned for their bullying mindset and tactics.  Advertising and marketing flaunt the “what’s in it for me” mentality.  Extravagance and ostentatious displays of opulence and greed have become the norm.  Noise and shallowness have replaced substance and thoughtfulness.  Government corruption is commonplace.  Corporations and banks rape the consumers and then bend the government over the table to extract bail-outs to fund their unrelenting greed.  People making millions of dollars steal so they can have more.  “Reality” TV brings the mindless inadequacies of people to the surface, effectively dumbing and numbing Americans while this audience of nitwits display their lack of substance by idolizing the mediocre.  Bi-partisan government and corruption evinces the true filth and worthlessness of politicians and their total lack of concern for what’s best for the country.  Instead, the focus is on what’s best for me.  Charities beg for money and then top officials either embezzle the funds or receive obscene salaries.   Everyone is offended due to lack of self-respect and personal insecurity as well as the impractical idea that they are right and everyone else is wrong.  Their eyes and mind are buried so deep into their communication devices that it is unlikely that anyone will learn critical thinking and how to think for themselves.

I’m sure I can go on with the comparison.  I also could find a great deal of good that has been created over the last sixty years with advances in medicine, technology, and embracing the global community.  However, I can only look at aspects of the times I have known in assessing the generations in question.

I just hope that The Greatest Generation is yet to come.

DD’s Blog Universe

Hello, all (probably one or two equals “all”).  Yes, it’s been a while.  Distractions, distractions distractions…I attended a reunion in South Bend, Indiana on June 2, 2017 commemorating the 47th anniversary of our stay in Angers, France.  Approximately 53 students from the University of Notre Dame, St. Mary’s College, and Rosary Hill College spent a year abroad.  The camaraderie was a dream come true as was the reunion after so many years apart.  I have attached below some thoughts I had as I reminisced over our journey over the decades.

 

A REUNION COMMEMORATING US 

Universite Catholique de l’Ouest

Angers, France 1969-70

 

 

We were given the gift of the past in the present.  We were together after too many years apart.  Old faces were radiant with the memory of our youth.  Eyes emanated life through the windows of our souls.  We spoke about the tales of our lives that covered those too many years, lives that were spawned by the adventures we shared and a love that could only exist in the union of our hearts.

If there is the slightest misgiving with coming together like this, it is that we will miss each other more than before.  Now that we’ve tasted the joy of each other’s company, it is hard not to hunger for more. We have been together once more.  We will miss each other again.

Those who had passed into whatever existence they may have imagined (many call it heaven) were part of the celebration.  Forever in our thoughts.  Forever in our hearts.

There were tears shed, embracing familiarity and reminiscence.  There was inspiration from all the people traveling across the country for us to be together, some despite compromised physical wellness.  And there was warm laughter.  Abundant laughter.  An elixir for the soul.

We looked into the mirror and saw ourselves from the seat we sit in now.  Our past in photos seen through present eyes.  A gap in time bridged as we sat together in fond remembrance.

Yes, we have received a priceless gift that I, for one, will forever cherish.

We are brothers and sisters.   We are family.

Pour Toujours…

DD’s Blog Universe

TRUTH IN ADVERTISING?  HARDLY… 

When I was growing up, television was in its infancy, at least as a technology readily available to every household.  It was a time when we had only two channels available and programming stopped at midnight.  The national anthem would play and then a logo with an annoying buzz would fill the airwaves until programming started again in the morning.

These were simple times.  Enjoyable times, when it was exciting to witness the technological advances that fostered in a new generation of communication.  I could also stretch the analogy to say they were innocent times, somewhat devoid of the scams and hustles that would ultimately find their way into existence as technology reached more and more people.

At the outset of television programming, the shows themselves were the feature.  Granted, there was not the sophistication there is today in presenting shows.  The Honeymooners, The Twilight Zone, Life of Riley, Howdy Doody, and a myriad of other such shows were simple in their presentation.  Of course, there were commercials, but they too were simple and an adjunct to the shows that people tuned in to watch.

Fast forward to today, 21st century and probably applicable to the late 20th century.  The TV shows are no longer the feature.  Advertising is.  Every show has anywhere between 12-15 commercials covering almost ten to twelve minutes of every 30 minute TV show. Billions of dollars are invested in these ads to get the advertisers hands into your pocket.  They are shameless, stupid, and fraudulent.  The products advertised are rarely equal to the hype presented in the ads.  Fancy language lures unsuspecting idiots into purchase.

It is not limited to TV.  Radio, print media, and the internet are other sources for the sickening glut of advertising.  And the practice mimics the sad trend in society where making obscene amounts of money is encouraged without concern for integrity.

I address this here as a thought I had recently.  However, I dedicate a whole volume of this blog to the same subject if you’re interested (DD’s Blog Universe Volume 5).